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guess america is very rich in shale. >> we are very rich in shale and we're very rich in technology to tap into that shale. >> we're not using it. >> we have -- we're using it in larger and larger ams. what's happened in the united states is we have had a shale gas revolution already with more potential. the technology is good. environmental standards are very high because the industry is making a major effort to ensure that there are no major mistakes that cause problems. so this will do two things. it creates a lot of jobs in this industry but it also lowers the cost of chemicals, it low weeere cost of gas, gasses backing out coal, backing out natural gas that we otherwise would import and otherwise increasing production of petroleum. we used to be dependent on imports of 60 percent of our petroleum and now 40%. potentially an exporter of natural gas, government regulations have to be worked out but we could be exporting natural gas if the right decisions are made to do that. the ams aamounts will obviously depend on certain decisions. no one would have imagined this ten years ago
a cover story today on the republicans and their problem with technology and stuart, this quote caught my eye "romney's senior strategist stuart stevens, may well be remembered by historians as the last guy to run a presidential campaign who never tweeted." >> really made -- if i had tweeted in this campaign this whole discussion we've been having about the second amendment would be replaced about the first amendment and whether it should apply to tweeting. listen i don't think that it would be a great mistake if we felt that technology in itself is going to save the republican party. technology is something to a large degree you can go out and purchase and if we think there's an off the shelf solution that you can with the republican party it's wrong. you know, we've had a lot of chance since the campaign to spend time with the obama folks and sometimes they had better technology. some cases we have better technologiment we don't have 140 character problem in the republican party. we have a larger problem that we have to look at and be patient about it. and trying to think that there's o
a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show u
. that is a question that authorities are wrestling with, while playing catch up with this technology. we look at the complicated question of what to do with drones. >> the skies across america could soon be welcoming more drones. the faa is seeking proposals from cities, states and universities to create six test sites for unmanned aircraft systems. the sites will allow them to develop safety standards that will allow drones to be fully integrated into the national air space by 2015. the drone industry said they make good economic sense. in the next three years after the faa figured out integration, we could see 70,000 jobs be created in the industry. >> the coast guard uses drones for surveillance on ice sheets in alaska and others were used during a border dispute. they will be monitoring pipelines by energy companies and by familiarers to monitor crops. new uses will need new rules to protect privacy. >> we do not want drones to be eyes in the sky spying on us. we need controls so that drones are only used when we have -- we believe a crime is happening or we are trying to do something par
to develop radiation. >> new things have to be sent into space. >> a lot of new things. the technology from that then goes out and stimulate the world economy like apollo and early space programs stimulated the economy of the world. i got an iphone on my hip that has 2000 times the memory of an apollo computer. can you imagine? the space station guys, they have texts, skype or something up there. and they're all on their laptops. it boggles your mind what is going on there technologically. >> today you could probably tweet what is going on on your flight. on your first and only flight, on the way back to earth, you got to do spacewalk. >> it was totally different. a different experience. as i described being on the moon, it contrasts the gray lunar surface with the blackness of space. people ask me what does the earth like from the moon? i said i cannot tell you because i landed in the center of the moon which took the earth directly overhead. in an apollo space suit, it is like being in a fishbowl. you move your head but the helmut does not move. so i did not get to see the earth very much
innovations in technology. bob rucker: "it's very rare for a journalism program to receive this amount of money. it showcases the amount of trust and support and interest that someone , on in the case of two people, jack and emma anderson had in our program. that's unique." two-point-three million dollars of the fund is available to the school of journalism....and six-point-four million dollars goes into an endowment. lane jimison is with the university's tower foundation which will manage the endowment. lane jimison: "an endowment is an account in which you put money in which you will never touch the principle of it. so it's invested, and the interest then will be for the school of journalism for ever and ever. so you will alway have money in your principle endowment account and every year you can count of a certain amount of interest every year." department chair... bob rucker... also says journalism students have much to look forward to in learning the new technology in the coming years. bob rucker: "technology is fantastic and we love it, but this was made possible through friendsh
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
of the technology store procurement vehicle) in which the amendment shall increase the contract amount from $60,490,000 to $90,580,000 for the period of january 1, 2009, through december 31, 2013. >> thank you very much. mr. jones? >> good morning, supervisors. bill jones, office of contract administration purchasing. i'm here today, this resolution requests your consideration to approve the [speaker not understood] contract amendment to xtech, one of the technology store vendors for it services and products, and the increase is from 60,490,000 to 90,580,000, an increase of 30,0 90,000 from the period january 1st, 2009 through december 31st, 2013. a short background. the technology store is made up of contracts to provide departments with pre-qualified vendors that provide a wide range of it services and products at competitive prices and in a timely manner. the vendors compete for business within the technology store. the vendors were selected through a competitive process and the original contracts were approved by the board of supervisors by resolution in december 2008. the contract terms st
was she was telling us to go forward 2030 in term of technologies and looking back to today. but this conference with all the vendors we had here had an amazing impact on me as learning of new technologies. i really feel in the 21st century of different types of technologies. i'm not going to make any pitches here. but bottom line is we are learning and this conference to me, and i know for many of us here, it was a great learning experience. thank you. >> awesome, thank you. (applause) >> thank you. all right. if we don't have any more questions, i'm going to give it over to drew to do his little sales pitch up there. or any announcements that need to be made. >> [speaker not understood]. >> okay, do you want the microphone? i'll hold it. i'm kidding. here you go. >> i'm obviously part of the nonprofit [speaker not understood], i have a products company. and for what it's worth, it hasn't gone to development yet. but we have a one-coat film that so far is working on traffic signs with unlimited cleanings. once it goes to market we'll let you know at the 2013 conference. we'
and then the last one is the national institutes of technology they are a group of scientists and engineers who look at tragic events and remember them so that the legacy of what they learned on one project is transferred to another. >> i just may interrupt if you don't mind. i just want to be kog that scent and i know that there are 38 more slides. what is most important to us in this budget update is getting a sense of the costs of each of the aspects of the package. what is actually mandated? and in order to be, i guess, a safety act project? and the cost of each of those individual packages. >> okay. >> i think that we all understand what the project is, what the implications are and the number of people that may are may not come through. i am going to have a number of questions about that as we month forward, but for me personally that is the most important aspect of this presentation, what we are very concerned about is containing costs. >> okay. >> and we are going to get, we are going to be getting to that. >> i know that it is in the presentation. >> i appreciate tha, but i think that it is
of the significance, it is the emerging technology and we made some improvement in the intrusion detection and does require light and so as the camera evolved and so did the lighting scheme with it. we are getting near the end of my list and thank you for being patient i want to do it confidently for you. >> there were many systems in a building, the tradition has been for the systems to be individual. and one of the things that the director changered with the team with was looking toward a future where the technology is designed in the building would represent state of the art when the building opened. >> and in order to accomplish that, the industry is pointed in the direction of providing hardware and software to colese these systems instead of looking at ten monitors you look at fewer and the information is collected and put through a policy engine, that is a decision-making engine that informed by people and actionable information is placed to people who under crisis may not think as clearly as they otherwise might. so a security, piecing system which is what we believe through current applic
and that everyone's committed to changing it and working on it. >> i would probably agree. i think in the technology field we need to do more around science and mathematics for people of color. i think that especially women coming into technology fields. i think also from a global perspective we really need to think about what that diversity really means in terms of levels of education, access to technology fields. >> pam, that goes back to your point about the invisible diversity, right? that there's the physical stuff that we need to diversify, obviously gender, rarks ethnicity-w but there may be other ways of thinking about what a diverse workforce looks like. what are some of those things? >> for us inclusion includes being culturally confident. so how do you get to know and understand better your consumers and what their preferences are? and one quick way of doing that or accelerated way of doing that is employing people who are of those cultures and understanding what they bring to the environment so that they can speak more to the consumers' needs. >> we each have to own the fact that we can'
. and i wanted to note on page 4 the technology upgrades. i would like to thank steven massey, it director, as much as possible, because he is one of the unheralded staff members who really does a lot in terms of servers and technology and the whole dashboard program. the updates to the electronic filing program really have been helpful, as i understand. and kudos to steven for that work. thank you. >> thank you. and i certainly echo the great work that mr. massey and the staff have done on our electronic filing. i do think it has added a lot of value, and i know the regulated community and the public i have heard have appreciated those efforts as well. anything else relating to the executive director's report from the commissionersin the next item on the agenda is items for future meetings. anybody would like to add anything? >> i just wanted to express appreciation for the interested persons meeting announcement, and i'm glad that we'll be talking about that report at a future meeting. some of the issues that were raised in the course of these conversations kind of come naturally into
to talk about fiber. there is technology available today where each individual home could be self-sufficient -- self-sufficient with its own energy sell. what is amazing is if we have 500 years of natural gas, there it is. nobody can attack us if every household has energy. we eliminate the grid because everyone has the wrong grade. there is a company in california that is powering e day using methane gas. that company is blue energy of california. host: the president signed an executive order last week regarding cyber security. some news about that, they intended to improve information sharing to establish a framework of cyber security best practices. "the white house spent the last several months crafting the order after congress failed to pass cyber security legislation last year. -- last year." we will talk more about this executive order at 8:30 with larry clinton, president and ceo of the internet security alliance. next, gil, missouri, democratic line. caller: it does not surprise me , an executive order once a month on something. in 1913 they passed a 17th amendment. the s
a meeting we try to do some new training or talk about the technology available, i will talk about the technology in my class this afternoon. it's really good because we document it because when you go to court, you can show training on a monthly basis. conferences, i can't tell you how excited i am these are happening. only in the last two or three years have these major conferences come about. the one up in canada, they were a great group of conferences and other people started to pick up on this. when i became an officer dealing with gravanis in 1991, there were no conferences and there was virtually no interest. as dr. spicer mentioned, every time it got good, i foupld myself out of a job. i was out of a job for about 6 months because it fell apart and then came back together. mer and more cities are realizing gravanis is a pattern crime and as dr. spicer pointed out, it's a great way crime to many other activities. so you can wind up precluding with a lot of other stuff by dealing with them when they are down to the part doing gravanis damage before they escalate to a mo
assessment of the climb. there have been problems and early technology often has a lot of problems and there are naysayers and people tell us why we shouldn't do it and too expensive. and early computers. ang you can still be subjective about it. >> we'll keep an eye on it. there's more news watch ahead. if you see something that you feel shows evidence of media bias, tweet us. up next, did the media interfere in a massive manhunt? >> a major manhunt for a rogue ex-cop gets major media attention. did the press get too close to the action? and did some in the media side with the killererererer hi. hi. i'm here to pick up some cacti. it should be under stephens. the verizon share everything plan for small business. get a shareable pool of data... got enough joshua trees? ... on up to 25 devices. so you can spend less time... yea, the golden barrels... managing wireless costs and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! ... and more bandages. that's powerful. sharble data plus unlimited talk and text.
of technological change in traditional society means that when someone learns there as a child is so useful when the person is old. but the rapid pace of technological change today means that what we learn as children is to longer useful 50 years later. and we older people are not fluent in the technologies center to surviving in modern society. for example, as a 15 year old high school student, i was considered outstandingly good at multiplying a two digit numbers because i memorize the multiplication table and i know how to use logarithm and then click of manipulating slide rule. .. to watch television i have to telephone the 25-year-old son and asking to me through it while i try to push those wretched 41 buttons. [laughter] what can we do to improve the lives of the elderly in the u.s. and the other use of their value? that's a huge problem. in our remaining few minutes today, i can offer just a few suggestions. one value as they are increasingly useful for offering quality child care if they choose to do it as more and more younger women into the workforce if you were young parent stay home
the russians as well, you know, we understand that our oil and gas fields are technologically behind. but no foreigner will ever known russian olive oil and gas so we are going to buy the technology for the western oil companies. so i had been a director of the corporation and i said so don't you understand that there's advantages in their technology they aren't coming to sell you their technology to make you a better conductor and he said that is a really good point. [laughter] and then he said are you still the director of hushovd rahm? i was the secretary of state, but in russia dmitry medvedev who was the deputy prime minister was also the chairman, so the state economy and portions lead up with fair amount of violence, too. now that he has decided that he is the once and future president of russia i think the chance that russia is going to break out of that and build on the other strengths it might have including a very smart population those have receded and i think unfortunately russia will not find a greater strength in the international economy it's pretty much dependent on
difference between these green technology boondoggles. >> so e mac, are they all boondoggles? do they pay off or not? clearly the one we mentioned at the beginning is a boondoggle. >> the ones we have now are boondoggles. i agree with rick. the technologies that seem to be working coming out of the government come from nasa or the military. and that's what we're seeing working. of course, a lot of spaghetti taxpayer dollars thrown against the wall. the market don't want electric cars or electric battery cars. it leaves them feeling like they'll be stranded in the woods without any gas or any power to get out of the woods. it stresses them out. so we talk a lot also about nat gas, yes, it's helped by the federal government, but that was a resource that was sitting there. electric batteries had to be developed by people with a lot of taxpayer money. >> morgan, even folks like from the "washington post," charles lane, was talking about how americans just don't want electric cars. for all the money we pour, for all the tax breaks we give to people who buy them, americans still don't want them bec
by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data offic
it -- us think through the problem. technology is still really important. the biggest challenge for the army from a technology perspective is this trade-off between mobility, survivability, and lethality. we found in afghanistan and iraq, because of low-tech weapons we lost our survivability. sorry tom a -- sorry, because we had to focus on mobility. we had to stay on roads. from a technological standpoint, we need people to start thinking about this. we need development and materials, we need to develop new ideas and how we can conduct operations and lethal operations. the last thing we talk about is -- leadership is the key going forward. i believe that in the future, it is about intergovernmental multinational environment. it is the ability of her leaders to operate in this environment, -- our leaders to operate in this environment and be able to move through this. what i have learned in the last 10 years is, it is not about what happened. it is about why it happened. once you figure out why it happened, you can come up with the right combination of solutions to fix the probl
. >>> just when you think we've got it all worked out, cutting-edge technology, scientific breakthroughs, miracle medicine, lately there's been talk about colonizing mars and many of you carry around a supercomputer right in your pocket. but just when you think you have it all worked out, the univers reminds us, we really don't. case in point, friday a chunk of space rock gets sucked in by the earth's gravitational pull. then streaks across the sky above russia. as it rockets through the atmosphere, friction heats the front of the rock a lot more than the back of it. the huge temperature difference is too much and essentially turns a meteor into a bomb. it explodes into a bunch of pieces. and what you're hearing here, that boom, boom, boom, is this -- take a look. those pieces are moving so fast they set up a series of sonic booms and it's just a scary sound. the sheer force is destructive, blowing out windows, knocking down huge doors and even taking down walls. there are reports that a huge chunk of it landed in a russian lake. many would like to see what's under that ice. conspiracy t
a felony. a wild scene. modern technology helps law trackedent officers .own a stolen car arrestedffic police him this afternoon. police say they were able to thek the car down using victim's iphone. they found him a short time a nearby hotel. concern is growing at the university of maryland after yet and assault.ry the latest incident happened shortly after midnight am i just from the college park campus. two students were attacked. say they haves the persons responsible in custody. those two men. the fifth crime incident on the campus so far this year,oming -- causing concern. >> it is all getting overwhelming. i do not walk to places. i take the bus. . stay in bigger groups they will not mess with you if it is a group of 10 people. university police say they are stepping up patrols and sending out alerts to students. we want to find out if there is to be alerted about when it comes to the weather. we had a wintry mix earlier today. we haveahead now? >> watching our radar all evening. some good news for us right now, especially around the beltway. to anhowers have come .nd lens athe
can spend less time... yea, the golden barrels... managing wireless costs and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! ... and more bandages. that's powerful. sharble data plus unlimited talk and text. now save $50 on a droid razr maxx hd by motorola. try align. it's the number one ge recommended probiotic that helps maintain digestive balance. ♪ stay in the groove with align. ♪ need help keeping your digesve balance in sync? try align. it's a probiotic that fortifies your digestive system with healthy bacteria 24/7. because your insides set the tone. stay in the groove with align. >> there's a live look at pope benedict xvi delivering a call to prayer at the vatican. one of his final appearances before he resigns the end of this month. our next guest met the pope when he was cardinal ratzinger, and he predicted that he would succeed pope john paul ii. >> joining us is from the school of law. >> glad to be with you. >> one of my first questions, we think about the catholic church, it's been underfi
. i'm trying to get to us look at things where can we go with the technology, what can we do with it and provide a little bit of how the space has evolved because i used to do similar things at google. in 2007 i came to work with google, where i ran advanced projects, where we did everything from the imaging systems for google street view to google earth to google maps to energy projects like google power meter. >> but when you look at ed lu you hear things like liquid robotics, 3-d imaging. >> right. >> and obviously b612. >> right. >> what's the unifying theme for ed lu? >> i think that ed is fascinated by the horizon, by what's over the next hill. it could be exploring space, it could be a new vehicle that paddles its way out into the ocean, it could be finding threats to the earth. >> i think we're living in a really special time now. for 4.5 billion years this planet has been hit by large asteroids, thousands of times, and we've reached the point where we as a species have figured out the technology that we could actually stop that process on this planet. i mean think ab
devices. so you can spend less time... yea, the golden barrels... managing wireless costs and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! that's powerful. sharble data plus unlimited talk and text. now save $50 on a droid razr maxx hd by motorola. i >> state of the union address on tuesday night, the president urged congress to do more to combat climate change or else. >> if congress will not act soon to predict futures i will. i will direct mipe cabinet to come up with executive actions to reduce poingsing lusion and prepare our communities with the climate and sustain with energy. >> the president will deal with the issue by taking in his own hand. giving him a grade on the report card. president of the polling company and editor of above the law and here with me in israel. country star and political commentator larry gatlin. larry, let me start wu. the president said he doesn't want to wait for congress. he will act on hisoin. how do you grade the president for making the unilateral arrangement, >> art ta
air technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort ... individualized. right now, queen mattresses start at just $599 . and save 50% on our limited edition bed-plus special offers through monday. >> jack lew, president obama's pick for treasury secretary faced questions on capitol hill this week about his tenure as a top executive at citigroup, the too big to fail bank that received a 45 million dollar taxpayer bailout. members of the finance committee pressed the former white house chief of staff about an almost 1 million dollar bonus he took home from citi in early 2005. as well as his investment in a venture capital fund registered in the cayman islands. >> why is the investment in the cayman islands? >> senator, i actually don't know why it was organized. i was not involved in setting up the fund. >> did you pay taxes on that investment? >> i reported all income related to the investment on my tax forms, i made
to protect the ranchers. and with increased manpower and technology, has dramatically reduced illegal border crossings. >> the fact of the matter is that substantial gains have been made. we need to make additional gains do we want them to feel safe in their homes? absolutely. >> reporter: but ranchers say they still feel unprotected on their own land, along a border they insist is not secure. mark porter, nbc news, arivaca, arizona. >>> it was an overwhelming display of affection outside the vatican today as tens of thousands crowded st. peter's square for one of pope benedict xvi final public appearances. the pope will set step dune 11 days from now setting in motion the search for a new leader and maybe a new direction for the catholic church. nbc's anne thompson is at the vat tan cannes tonight with more. anne? >> reporter: good evening, lester. tonight, the pope is on a week-long lenten retreat inside vatican with the dives his papacy numbered. now, every public appearance of benedict sass must-s-- benedicta mist-see event. for more than 50,000 people, this was the place to be a vigil o
wireless costs and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! ... and more bandages. that's powerful. sharble data plus unlimited talk and text. now save $50 on a droid razr maxx hd by motorola. ♪ right. but the most important feature of all is... the capital one purchase eraser. i can redeem the double miles i earned with my venture card to erase recent travel purchases. d with a few clicks, this mission never happened. uh, what's this button do? [ electricity zaps ] ♪ you requested backup? yes. yes i did. what's in your wallet? >> in the wake . metor shower that struck russia that injured 1200 people. we are hearing about future threats . the professor for the university of hawaii is looking on a tracking system that will track when and where the metor hits. >> it would position within a mile and happen to a such and such a time. >> the project got five million in funding from nasa. in the end of the day. it is the president's decision and i can't believe one democratic colleague is not upset enough to s
shake. >>> just when you think we've got it all worked out, cutting-edge technology, scientific breakthroughs, miracle medicine, lately there's been talk about colonizing mars and many of you carry around a supercomputer right in your pocket. but just when you think you have it all worked out, the universe reminds us, we really don't. case in point, friday a chunk of space rock gets sucked in by the earth's gravitational pull. then streaks across the sky above russia. as it rockets through the atmosphere, friction heats the front of the rock a lot more than the back of it. the huge temperature difference is too much and essentially turns a meteor into a bomb. it explodes into a bunch of pieces. and what you're hearing here, that boom, boom, boom, is this -- take a look. those pieces are moving so fast they set up a series of sonic booms and it's just a scary sound. the sheer force is destructive, blowing out windows, knocking down huge doors and even taking down walls. there are reports that a huge chunk of it landed in a russian lake. many would like to see what's under that ic
is happening to the jobs being created in wind and solar and waves and algae technology? what's going to happen to the electric car. no. we need to say yes to science and technology, yes to our health and our future. yes to local economies being able to sustain and say yes, we have clean water, we have vegetables, we have meat that is not -- animals that are not dying and fish not rising to the top of the lakes because of ground water coming up with methane and all the chemicals, most of which we don't even have disclosed to us to know. no gag orders on us to tell us. this is what we need. we need transparency. we need real information. we don't need the same advertising companies who told us it was ok to smoke and hospitals telling us that fracking is safe. no. we didn't believe you then. we don't believe you now. no fracking, no tar sands, yes on innovative technology for our future. we're not inheriting trillions of dollars of debt and water we can't drink. food we can't eat. no. so thank you so much for making this issue front and center, making sure that he understands and all the other le
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on monday, march fourth, on science, technology and engineering and math. and it will also meet in april first, monday, to address credit recovery, some of the comments that we heard earlier about a, to g requirements and that will be the topic in april. the ad hoc committee will meet march 11th. i will be out of the country but commissioner wynns will be preceding in meeting but i also have a few other reports. >> yes, the buildings and grounds will be meeting on the 28th and city and school districts select committee will be meeting, i am sorry building and grounds will be meeting on the 25th and select committee will be meeting on the 28th. >> thank you. all right, any announce, oh, i know i want to announce that i am appointing commissioner murase to be the representative on the ad fund board effective today so thank you for agreeing to take that on. and then any other reports from board members? >> yes, commissioner murase? >> i just want to congratulate the community for january, 27th, very successful, fred, 16 honorees from all corners of the community and it was a really wonderfu
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